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Saturday, April 25, 2015

Surrogacy in Nepal: International Surrogacy Disaster

One of the families currently stranded in Nepal with their newborns


Today our thoughts and prayers are with the surrogates, babies and intended parents who have been impacted by the terrible earthquake in Nepal.   There are reports of several Israeli families with premature babies who are trying to get out of the country.   I can only imagine how scared and worried they are as they try to keep their fragile babies safe.

One of the primary reservations I had when people first began touting Nepal as the next location for international surrogacy was the fragility of  infrastructure in the country.  For years experts have been warning about the danger to the area from earthquake,   especially given that in recent years construction has been largely unregulated.   Even prior to the quake, Nepal's medical infrastructure was fragile, not a single hospital in the country was accredited by the International Joint Commission on patient safety.   Now those facilities are overcrowded and running short on emergency supplies, and morgues are running out of space. BIR hospital is reported to be treating people in the streets.

Hours after the quake, the death toll is already above 1500.   However, surviving the initial quake and its  aftershocks is only the first hurdle that must be overcome.   The country is highly dependent on hydroelectric power plants, it's not yet clear what damage they have sustained.  Interruptions to the power grid are not unusual in Katmandu,  so many people and businesses have generators, however, given the significant damage to roads moving fuel to where it is needed is going to be very difficult.

I doubt that fertility clinics are going to be given first priority for allocation of what is likely going to be a scarce commodity.  This could have grave consequences not only for surrogates in housing, but for the thousands of embryos imported there in recent months.  

Cholera is a regular problem in Nepal, one which could easily become epidemic given the difficulty in maintaining clean water and adequate sanitation after a disaster of this magnitude.

When people advertise they are experts at surrogacy in a third world country the implication they are giving to intended parents is that they are prepared for the worst.   Unfortunately, as has been seen repeatedly, many of the so called "experts" are little more than expensive glorified travel agents with little to know understanding of the challenges that may be faced even under the best of conditions.  I have zero faith have the ability to truly help intended parents under conditions like these.


9 comments:

  1. So very sad. There but for the grace of God go we...

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  2. I am trying to wrap my head around the idea of people going to Nepal for IVF and surrogacy but I simply can't. We have officially entered the twilight zone with this model. This is one of the most primitive countries on this planet. India is a model of Swiss efficiency compared to Nepal and yet the "travel agents", aka Western touts, are giving everyone the deepest assurances that this is a legitimate and viable option. It is horrible. Just horrible. When you call these people glorified travel agents, you are giving them way too much credit; most of them are even below the rank of used car salesmen. I hope this serves as a lesson to people looking at Nepal. For those ignorant of geography the country has only one main city - Katmandu - now that the city has suffered this calamity the entire country has basically shut down. Unimaginable being an IP under these circumstances. J

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    1. I understand that there are intended parents who believe that Nepal is the only option that they have. However, I think there is a considerable difference between a person making an informed decision to accept a significant level of risk vs. someone being misled about the risks they are taking. NO ONE is an "expert on surrogacy in Nepal" Period. Full stop. It's too new there for anyone to have gone through the process enough times to make them an expert. Posting pictures of your five star hotel and bragging about your "state of the art clinic" gives people the illusion that they will receive care similar to that available in the US. Putting it bluntly, it doesn't matter how "state of the art" your equipment is if it's not hooked to a reliable source of power. I don't care how beautiful your hotel might be, that means nothing if your premature baby can't get her oxygen canister refilled.

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  3. Hello to all, I don’t think that Surrogacy in Nepal is a disaster for that country because of surrogacy LGBT Couples & Single parents gets a new baby in their incomplete life at affordable cost also surrogacy help those poor families who don’t have enough resources to fulfill their basic need
    http://www.ivfsurrogacynepal.com/

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    1. Mr. Sharma, with all due respect, for you to recommend surrogacy in Nepal, when the country is still facing absolutely catastrophic and heartbreaking conditions is the height of irresponsibility.

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    2. Wow. You don't even introduce yourself and you have the gall to try and ADVERTISE on the blog of a grieving mother? If you're claiming to be a representative for the surrogacy industry in Nepal, I believe you've just proved what a truly horrible plan going to Nepal for surrogacy would be.

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  4. When have you been to Nepal to see the conditions first hand? Or are you getting all your knowledge from CNN? Very little of Kathmandu is damaged, it's hard to find damage. The hospitals used for surrogacy are not ones that locals use, so how is it irresponsible for anyone to go to Nepal for surrogacy? I guess its okay for you to malign the process, you have your child.

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    1. Excuse me but, among the many, many errors in your statement, I feel the need to draw attention to one in particular. It's true that Rhy has a child. One. One living child. She had two, you see. Twins. One died, in India, due to gross medical mismanagement. Which you would know if you'd pay any attention at all to this blog aside from this one post. I would say that, at this point, there is NO ONE in the world more qualified than she to evaluate "the process"of surrogacy. But kudos on your massive social faux pas. I'm sure your stupidity will serve you well in the future.

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